Sorry To Bother You

A mixed indie comedy with clever diatribes on workplace dynamics, capitalism, identity, and dispensable labor led by charismatic Lakeith Stanfield, but some downright WTF self-indulgences & hard-sell plot points – like man-horses. 7.1/10.

In an alternate reality of present-day Oakland, California., telemarketer Cassius Green finds himself in a macabre universe after he discovers a magical key that leads to material glory. As Green’s career begins to take off, his friends and co-workers organize a protest against corporate oppression. Cassius soon falls under the spell of Steve Lift, a cocaine-snorting CEO who offers him a salary beyond his wildest dreams.

*Possible spoilers ahead*

Summary: A mixed indie comedy with clever diatribes on workplace dynamics, capitalism, identity, and dispensable labor led by charismatic Lakeith Stanfield, but some downright WTF self-indulgences & plot points like the man-horses. STBY is certainly.. one of the most unique films of the year. Debuting rapper-turned-director Boots Riley turns a lot of film conventions on their head with a script lofty in its goals of (smartly) dissecting the current state of power dynamics in the workplace, treatment of minorities, capitalistic society and its treatment of dispensable labor, and how far people will go to attain identity and some feeling of self-fulfilment. Sounds great right? Well, in the same film, there are also thrust in some downright weird and uncomfortable self-indulgences and quirks bordering at times on WTF like Detroit’s.. unique jewelry and gaggingly political shirts, and an ending that will make you never look at horses the same way again (trust me). Overall though, despite its objective flaws and divisive quality you have to be willing to see weird indie cinema to make it through, Sorry To Bother You is a certainly unforgettable project bolstered by a star-powered cast from Stanfield to Terry Crews to Armie Hammer, smart script putting a magnifying glass to seemingly normal jobs like 9-5 telemarketing firms and well-developing its characters, and stellar soundtrack and end feel (refreshingly) giving you ideas to think about when going to the movies. 7.1/10.

Overall Rating: 7.1/10