Dirty Harry (1971)

The Biggest Plot Hole Of The 2000’s

A Final Act That Regresses To A Superiority-Complex Power-Trip That Decimates The Possibility Of Real, Equal Romance Deserved

Photograph Courtesy Of: Hulu Originals

Flaws in Palm Springs are almost non-existent until the final act – it’s nearly a perfect film until then. The film lays out its plot so that as soon as Nyles and Sarah finally cement their new relationship officiality with sexual intercourse, the next morning we learn that she had sex with the groom-to-be at her own sister’s wedding. The revelation comes in like a jackhammer – did she just cheat with Nyles right after the film presented us with this perfect romance climax the genre has conditioned us to expect to be pure and straightforward with us, or was she always waking up beside him in the original version of this day? The film later reveals the latter to be the correct explanation, so it begs to question: why did she go haywire on Nyles the night after a perfect romance culmination after waking up for days or weeks beforehand smiling every day from being so butterfly-activation in love with him? Blaming self-destructive tendencies on that one is just weak storytelling and lazy screenwriting that is never explained. Easily 10x worse though and the single-handed factor that dropped the score a minimum full letter grade: the physics PhD & fake-feminism panders. Throughout the final act, the film regresses on its previously-balanced canvas of gender dynamics refreshingly showing just as many duplicitous acts committed by each instead of only men like many films nowadays – into this weird superiority-flex where Sarah becomes an ego-maniac and randomly superhuman. Her final line after Nyles’ big heartfelt apology (for only one thing in having slept with her before in previous timelines, something she literally made fun of him for not having sex with more wedding members in the loop – hypocrisy) being ‘I Don’t NEED You … but maybe the future can be somewhat less boring with you’. Is that what passes for romance in this new wave of feminism: the guy being a desperate puppy dog or toy begging and crying the only way he wants to be alive is with her, and the girl royally grating a a fraction of her precious time to playing with her new toy and putting it down whenever she wants to or feels like it? Romance and love is supposed to be an equal and shared experience, not.. whatever this is.

The Biggest Plot Hole Of The 2000’s

A PhD In Theoretical Physics, One Of The Most Complex & Longest Fields, Earned By A Rando-Girl With No Background In A Few Days In A Coffee Shop.. Because #Feminism!

Photograph Courtesy Of: Hulu Originals

The most laughable part of the whole movie, though, is relatedly on this fake-feminist superiority-complex power-trip is the fact that Sarah, a wedding attendee with absolutely no indication of any prior experience past High School, earns a PhD in Theoretical Physics – perhaps the most complex and difficult scientific field in the world, and one it takes an average of 7-10 post-grad to earn, more so without a background or college experience in it – in a couple of days/weeks. This is the most ridiculous plot hole I’ve seen in the entire 2000’s, a disrespectful subjugation of the entire field and brilliant men and women who have devoted their lives to studying the mysteries of the universe – all so some wedding attendee girl with no remote indication of any type of background education across the film can swoop in and earn one, or even MULTIPLE PhD’s in a couple of days or weeks max.. because #feminism and #girlpower! I have no problem with Sarah earning the degrees, being an Ivy League-graduate with degrees in science myself I have seen plenty of brilliant women accomplish phenomenal things in STEM, support feminism and equality in cinematic representation, and actually like the concept most time-loop films have ignored but would likely be the only real way out of a temporal cycle in real life – but this is just ridiculous and belittles the loftiest intellectual achievements into something a rando-girl with no background can learn in a week or two at a coffee shop.. because women are just that intellectually-superior and should be bowed down to – a ludicrously-irresponisble power-trip fantasy that elicited a vomit-reflex. That would be like someone having never even touched a basketball before picking one up, and within a week or two being able to beat a prime Michael Jordan in a 1-on-1 game. Don’t pretend to know a field most people wouldn’t last the first class in, just for cinematic pandering. The film plays its card that this superiority-complexing under the guise of innocent feminism is what the arc was all about by the fact that she has to be shutting down real PhD’s in the field like Dr. Clifford Johnson, PhD at USC in Zoom-calls just because he’s a man, and has to dumb it down to explain to another man: Nyles when the film makes no prior points that they had any previous deviation in education levels beforehand. What could’ve been solved by even a simple two-second time-card inclusion to let it be known this took years and years to learn and get to this educational level if the film was even decently-responsible is again non-supported by its screenplay’s events – Nyles crying over her and being unable to do anything else in life the entire time of her study-trip, which would’ve dissipated quickly over years to the point where he barely remembers her by the time she came back.

A Polticized Start & Mixed End

The Mandate Of Man-Hate From Ep. 1 Is Off-Putting, Tiresome, & Hypocritical On Its Horrors-Of-Trauma Theme; Anticlimax End

Photograph Courtesy Of: Netflix Originals

The series thus self-sabotages and suffers an identity-crisis holding it back from being truly great in either category: horror or (its far-closer achievement as) romance. The frame story angle was also not the smartest idea kind of ruining the effect knowing it’s a story and ostensibly-fictional instead of happening live to real characters and stakes, clichés-omnipresent in child horror, possession, mini-houses ,and ghost stories in general, and ‘dead live forever’ theme wholly-recycled from the first season and a hackneyed and over-belabored part that’s amongst the worst parts of THOBM – in heated competition with its hypocritical man-hate politicization. [Sigh]. Here we go again: it is inexplicable how or why such angry fake-feminist propaganda keeps seeping its way into pop culture and mass media. This is not equality as most level-headed people and CLC support worldwide; this is trying to paint men as evil or inferior – here not even just limited to men, but even boys aren’t safe now. From the first episode, we are barraged with an avalanche of mansplaining, demonization, violence, thievery, infidelity, physical abuse, deadbeat substitute-fatherhood, creepy-smiles by little boys watching their nannies get undressed, and problematic language like ‘men [being] the thing that tears down ambitious young women’ and ‘you’re such a lovely man.. why must you speak?’. Even the subtle nuances paint troubling imagery like gospel accounts linking men, demons, and pigs: nice. The horrors-of-trauma is a central theme in THOBM and one of its core empathy-invokers being the suicide of Miss Jessel – but the show hypocritically-creates its own trauma for young coming-of-age boys and men watching and being constantly told in every direction they look that they’re bad, ‘trash’ and were born with these toxic/evil characteristics because of their gender.. pure, real trauma that lingers negatively in the mind and is a commonly-mentioned partial-driver of the group already committing suicide by the biggest margin in world-history in modern-times: men (at rates 3-4X greater than women’s by CDC metrics FYI, and this type of hate-mongering propaganda being forced into a TV show people go to for escapism/relaxation does nothing but make it worse).

A Ghost Love Story

The Central Theme Of The Series Is Love – & The Tragedies It Paints Across Its Many Are Great, Except Better-Deserving LGBTQ+ Arc

Photograph Courtesy Of: Netflix Originals

Bizarre even more about the whole show is that, after painting men as such inexorable irritations making everything worse early-on, the show does a complete-180 and explains that their misgivings and poor actions early-on were caused by other problems. Quint was killed right before he was about to make his big escape to America with Miss Jessel, Miles was possessed by a vengeful mature spirit driving his actions against his will for his misgivings, and Henry was subject to horrors-of-the-mind and the guilt of betrayal of why he distanced from the children – and was given 100% of the blame/banished by his dead brother even though Charlotte was just as much to blame for her infidelity to her husband with his brother. The entire back-half of the season repents for these jabs by not even having really one bad thing to say about men either, a refreshing reversal that makes you partially-forgive but not forget its poor-taste start that will inevitably make many viewers turn off the show out of lecture and PTSD – sadly not giving it a chance as it improves towards the finale. The show really is all about love – of the ghost-love variety specifically. The Bonnie-and-Clyde love of Jessel & Peter, the heart-warming courtship of Owen-and-Ms.-Grose, childhood sweetheart cuties Dani and Eddie, LGBTQ+ romance of Dani and Jamie, future wedding of Flora and her boyfriend, and 17th Century business-partnership-turned-marriage of Viola and Lloyd are all painted and developed magnificently – rosy in love until they each end in horrific tragedies as the main horror theme of the series. The LGBTQ+ arc was the best one we were really rooting-for, but its handling is problematic and unfortunate. The arc feels forced and sadly almost like conversion-propaganda because of its politicization of man-hate: a second-prize to run-to away-from men (even worsely-scripted because its from Eddie who dies horrifically ~because of Dani’s actions and is then resorted to being the ghost haunting her & ruining her relationship as well as driving it when his life ended tragically) as a backup instead of the first choice, only-option, and real love most LGBTQ+ members feel for their chosen partner and orientation. The romance between Dani and Jamie is great and we love and see the pure beauty in LGBTQ+ and lesbian romance (check out our review of Portrait Of A Lady On Fire: one of our top-rated films of the 2000’s so-far) just as much as any other type of romance – we just wish it was painted better and not problematically by its origin.